Color Soaked

Lath mar Holi (Hindi: लट्ठमार होली) is a local celebration of the Hindu festival of Holi. It takes place well before the actual Holi in the town of Barsana near Mathura in the state of Uttar Pradesh. The name means "that Holi in which people hit with sticks" (laṭh is a thick traditional staff). Legend has it that Lord Krishna visited his beloved Radha's village on this day and playfully teased her and her friends. Taking offence at this, the women of Barsana chased him away. Since then, men from Krishna's village, Nandgaon, visit Barsana to play Holi in the town which has the distinction of having the only temple dedicated to Radha in India. In the sprawling compound of the Radha Rani temple in Barsana, thousands gather to witness the Lath Mar holi when women beat up men with sticks (laṭh or lāṭhī) as those on the sidelines become hysterical, sing Holi Songs and shout Sri Radhey or Sri Krishna. The Holi songs of Braj mandal are sung in pure Braj Bhasha. On the first day of Lath Mar Holi gops ( shepherds ) from Nandgaon come to Barsana to play Holi with the gopis of Barsana. The festival begins with a ceremony at the Radha Rani temple. After this ceremony gops then march out of the temple on the Rang Rangeeli Gali where they stop to play holi with the gopis, who stand in groups along the street. The second day gops from Barsana go to Nandgaon to play holi with gopis at Nandgaon. Holi played at Barsana is unique in the sense that here women chase men away with sticks. Males also sing provocative songs in a bid to invite the attention of women. Women then go on the offensive and use long staves called "lathis" to beat men folk who protect themselves with shields. The women of Barsana start preparing a month in advance. 'The mother-in-laws feed their daughters-in-law rich food so that they show off their prowess on the Holi battle zone. It is a show of love, fun and equality.

Rang Rasiya

People singing joyous Holi songs at Krishna temple in Nandgaon. Lath mar Holi (Hindi: लट्ठमार होली) is a local celebration of the Hindu festival of Holi. It takes place well before the actual Holi in the town of Barsana near Mathura in the state of Uttar Pradesh. The name means "that Holi in which people hit with sticks" (laṭh is a thick traditional staff). Legend has it that Lord Krishna visited his beloved Radha's village on this day and playfully teased her and her friends. Taking offence at this, the women of Barsana chased him away. Since then, men from Krishna's village, Nandgaon, visit Barsana to play Holi in the town which has the distinction of having the only temple dedicated to Radha in India. In the sprawling compound of the Radha Rani temple in Barsana, thousands gather to witness the Lath Mar holi when women beat up men with sticks (laṭh or lāṭhī) as those on the sidelines become hysterical, sing Holi Songs and shout Sri Radhey or Sri Krishna. The Holi songs of Braj mandal are sung in pure Braj Bhasha. On the first day of Lath Mar Holi gops ( shepherds ) from Nandgaon come to Barsana to play Holi with the gopis of Barsana. The festival begins with a ceremony at the Radha Rani temple. After this ceremony gops then march out of the temple on the Rang Rangeeli Gali where they stop to play holi with the gopis, who stand in groups along the street. The second day gops from Barsana go to Nandgaon to play holi with gopis at Nandgaon. Holi played at Barsana is unique in the sense that here women chase men away with sticks. Males also sing provocative songs in a bid to invite the attention of women. Women then go on the offensive and use long staves called "lathis" to beat men folk who protect themselves with shields. The women of Barsana start preparing a month in advance. 'The mother-in-laws feed their daughters-in-law rich food so that they show off their prowess on the Holi battle zone. It is a show of love, fun and equality.

Color me Red

Lath mar Holi (Hindi: लट्ठमार होली) is a local celebration of the Hindu festival of Holi. It takes place well before the actual Holi in the town of Barsana near Mathura in the state of Uttar Pradesh. The name means "that Holi in which people hit with sticks" (laṭh is a thick traditional staff). Legend has it that Lord Krishna visited his beloved Radha's village on this day and playfully teased her and her friends. Taking offence at this, the women of Barsana chased him away. Since then, men from Krishna's village, Nandgaon, visit Barsana to play Holi in the town which has the distinction of having the only temple dedicated to Radha in India. In the sprawling compound of the Radha Rani temple in Barsana, thousands gather to witness the Lath Mar holi when women beat up men with sticks (laṭh or lāṭhī) as those on the sidelines become hysterical, sing Holi Songs and shout Sri Radhey or Sri Krishna. The Holi songs of Braj mandal are sung in pure Braj Bhasha. On the first day of Lath Mar Holi gops ( shepherds ) from Nandgaon come to Barsana to play Holi with the gopis of Barsana. The festival begins with a ceremony at the Radha Rani temple. After this ceremony gops then march out of the temple on the Rang Rangeeli Gali where they stop to play holi with the gopis, who stand in groups along the street. The second day gops from Barsana go to Nandgaon to play holi with gopis at Nandgaon. Holi played at Barsana is unique in the sense that here women chase men away with sticks. Males also sing provocative songs in a bid to invite the attention of women. Women then go on the offensive and use long staves called "lathis" to beat men folk who protect themselves with shields. The women of Barsana start preparing a month in advance. 'The mother-in-laws feed their daughters-in-law rich food so that they show off their prowess on the Holi battle zone. It is a show of love, fun and equality.

Color Palette

Lath mar Holi (Hindi: लट्ठमार होली) is a local celebration of the Hindu festival of Holi. It takes place well before the actual Holi in the town of Barsana near Mathura in the state of Uttar Pradesh. The name means "that Holi in which people hit with sticks" (laṭh is a thick traditional staff). Legend has it that Lord Krishna visited his beloved Radha's village on this day and playfully teased her and her friends. Taking offence at this, the women of Barsana chased him away. Since then, men from Krishna's village, Nandgaon, visit Barsana to play Holi in the town which has the distinction of having the only temple dedicated to Radha in India. In the sprawling compound of the Radha Rani temple in Barsana, thousands gather to witness the Lath Mar holi when women beat up men with sticks (laṭh or lāṭhī) as those on the sidelines become hysterical, sing Holi Songs and shout Sri Radhey or Sri Krishna. The Holi songs of Braj mandal are sung in pure Braj Bhasha. On the first day of Lath Mar Holi gops ( shepherds ) from Nandgaon come to Barsana to play Holi with the gopis of Barsana. The festival begins with a ceremony at the Radha Rani temple. After this ceremony gops then march out of the temple on the Rang Rangeeli Gali where they stop to play holi with the gopis, who stand in groups along the street. The second day gops from Barsana go to Nandgaon to play holi with gopis at Nandgaon. Holi played at Barsana is unique in the sense that here women chase men away with sticks. Males also sing provocative songs in a bid to invite the attention of women. Women then go on the offensive and use long staves called "lathis" to beat men folk who protect themselves with shields. The women of Barsana start preparing a month in advance. 'The mother-in-laws feed their daughters-in-law rich food so that they show off their prowess on the Holi battle zone. It is a show of love, fun and equality.

Color Drenched

Lath mar Holi (Hindi: लट्ठमार होली) is a local celebration of the Hindu festival of Holi. It takes place well before the actual Holi in the town of Barsana near Mathura in the state of Uttar Pradesh. The name means "that Holi in which people hit with sticks" (laṭh is a thick traditional staff). Legend has it that Lord Krishna visited his beloved Radha's village on this day and playfully teased her and her friends. Taking offence at this, the women of Barsana chased him away. Since then, men from Krishna's village, Nandgaon, visit Barsana to play Holi in the town which has the distinction of having the only temple dedicated to Radha in India. In the sprawling compound of the Radha Rani temple in Barsana, thousands gather to witness the Lath Mar holi when women beat up men with sticks (laṭh or lāṭhī) as those on the sidelines become hysterical, sing Holi Songs and shout Sri Radhey or Sri Krishna. The Holi songs of Braj mandal are sung in pure Braj Bhasha. On the first day of Lath Mar Holi gops ( shepherds ) from Nandgaon come to Barsana to play Holi with the gopis of Barsana. The festival begins with a ceremony at the Radha Rani temple. After this ceremony gops then march out of the temple on the Rang Rangeeli Gali where they stop to play holi with the gopis, who stand in groups along the street. The second day gops from Barsana go to Nandgaon to play holi with gopis at Nandgaon. Holi played at Barsana is unique in the sense that here women chase men away with sticks. Males also sing provocative songs in a bid to invite the attention of women. Women then go on the offensive and use long staves called "lathis" to beat men folk who protect themselves with shields. The women of Barsana start preparing a month in advance. 'The mother-in-laws feed their daughters-in-law rich food so that they show off their prowess on the Holi battle zone. It is a show of love, fun and equality.

Happydent

Lath mar Holi (Hindi: लट्ठमार होली) is a local celebration of the Hindu festival of Holi. It takes place well before the actual Holi in the town of Barsana near Mathura in the state of Uttar Pradesh. The name means "that Holi in which people hit with sticks" (laṭh is a thick traditional staff). Legend has it that Lord Krishna visited his beloved Radha's village on this day and playfully teased her and her friends. Taking offence at this, the women of Barsana chased him away. Since then, men from Krishna's village, Nandgaon, visit Barsana to play Holi in the town which has the distinction of having the only temple dedicated to Radha in India. In the sprawling compound of the Radha Rani temple in Barsana, thousands gather to witness the Lath Mar holi when women beat up men with sticks (laṭh or lāṭhī) as those on the sidelines become hysterical, sing Holi Songs and shout Sri Radhey or Sri Krishna. The Holi songs of Braj mandal are sung in pure Braj Bhasha. On the first day of Lath Mar Holi gops ( shepherds ) from Nandgaon come to Barsana to play Holi with the gopis of Barsana. The festival begins with a ceremony at the Radha Rani temple. After this ceremony gops then march out of the temple on the Rang Rangeeli Gali where they stop to play holi with the gopis, who stand in groups along the street. The second day gops from Barsana go to Nandgaon to play holi with gopis at Nandgaon. Holi played at Barsana is unique in the sense that here women chase men away with sticks. Males also sing provocative songs in a bid to invite the attention of women. Women then go on the offensive and use long staves called "lathis" to beat men folk who protect themselves with shields. The women of Barsana start preparing a month in advance. 'The mother-in-laws feed their daughters-in-law rich food so that they show off their prowess on the Holi battle zone. It is a show of love, fun and equality.

Happy at Holi

Prayer in colors

Spread the Color of Joy

Lath mar Holi (Hindi: लट्ठमार होली) is a local celebration of the Hindu festival of Holi. It takes place well before the actual Holi in the town of Barsana near Mathura in the state of Uttar Pradesh. The name means "that Holi in which people hit with sticks" (laṭh is a thick traditional staff). Legend has it that Lord Krishna visited his beloved Radha's village on this day and playfully teased her and her friends. Taking offence at this, the women of Barsana chased him away. Since then, men from Krishna's village, Nandgaon, visit Barsana to play Holi in the town which has the distinction of having the only temple dedicated to Radha in India. In the sprawling compound of the Radha Rani temple in Barsana, thousands gather to witness the Lath Mar holi when women beat up men with sticks (laṭh or lāṭhī) as those on the sidelines become hysterical, sing Holi Songs and shout Sri Radhey or Sri Krishna. The Holi songs of Braj mandal are sung in pure Braj Bhasha. On the first day of Lath Mar Holi gops ( shepherds ) from Nandgaon come to Barsana to play Holi with the gopis of Barsana. The festival begins with a ceremony at the Radha Rani temple. After this ceremony gops then march out of the temple on the Rang Rangeeli Gali where they stop to play holi with the gopis, who stand in groups along the street. The second day gops from Barsana go to Nandgaon to play holi with gopis at Nandgaon. Holi played at Barsana is unique in the sense that here women chase men away with sticks. Males also sing provocative songs in a bid to invite the attention of women. Women then go on the offensive and use long staves called "lathis" to beat men folk who protect themselves with shields. The women of Barsana start preparing a month in advance. 'The mother-in-laws feed their daughters-in-law rich food so that they show off their prowess on the Holi battle zone. It is a show of love, fun and equality.

At Father's Feet

The Broom

Color Happy

Fending Himself

A "Gwala" fending himself from the ":laathi" of a "gopi" at a Latthmaar Holi at Nandgaon. Lath mar Holi (Hindi: लट्ठमार होली) is a local celebration of the Hindu festival of Holi. It takes place well before the actual Holi in the town of Barsana near Mathura in the state of Uttar Pradesh. The name means "that Holi in which people hit with sticks" (laṭh is a thick traditional staff). Legend has it that Lord Krishna visited his beloved Radha's village on this day and playfully teased her and her friends. Taking offence at this, the women of Barsana chased him away. Since then, men from Krishna's village, Nandgaon, visit Barsana to play Holi in the town which has the distinction of having the only temple dedicated to Radha in India. In the sprawling compound of the Radha Rani temple in Barsana, thousands gather to witness the Lath Mar holi when women beat up men with sticks (laṭh or lāṭhī) as those on the sidelines become hysterical, sing Holi Songs and shout Sri Radhey or Sri Krishna. The Holi songs of Braj mandal are sung in pure Braj Bhasha. On the first day of Lath Mar Holi gops ( shepherds ) from Nandgaon come to Barsana to play Holi with the gopis of Barsana. The festival begins with a ceremony at the Radha Rani temple. After this ceremony gops then march out of the temple on the Rang Rangeeli Gali where they stop to play holi with the gopis, who stand in groups along the street. The second day gops from Barsana go to Nandgaon to play holi with gopis at Nandgaon. Holi played at Barsana is unique in the sense that here women chase men away with sticks. Males also sing provocative songs in a bid to invite the attention of women. Women then go on the offensive and use long staves called "lathis" to beat men folk who protect themselves with shields. The women of Barsana start preparing a month in advance. 'The mother-in-laws feed their daughters-in-law rich food so that they show off their prowess on the Holi battle zone. It is a show of love, fun and equality.

Colors in the Air

Lath mar Holi (Hindi: लट्ठमार होली) is a local celebration of the Hindu festival of Holi. It takes place well before the actual Holi in the town of Barsana near Mathura in the state of Uttar Pradesh. The name means "that Holi in which people hit with sticks" (laṭh is a thick traditional staff). Legend has it that Lord Krishna visited his beloved Radha's village on this day and playfully teased her and her friends. Taking offence at this, the women of Barsana chased him away. Since then, men from Krishna's village, Nandgaon, visit Barsana to play Holi in the town which has the distinction of having the only temple dedicated to Radha in India. In the sprawling compound of the Radha Rani temple in Barsana, thousands gather to witness the Lath Mar holi when women beat up men with sticks (laṭh or lāṭhī) as those on the sidelines become hysterical, sing Holi Songs and shout Sri Radhey or Sri Krishna. The Holi songs of Braj mandal are sung in pure Braj Bhasha. On the first day of Lath Mar Holi gops ( shepherds ) from Nandgaon come to Barsana to play Holi with the gopis of Barsana. The festival begins with a ceremony at the Radha Rani temple. After this ceremony gops then march out of the temple on the Rang Rangeeli Gali where they stop to play holi with the gopis, who stand in groups along the street. The second day gops from Barsana go to Nandgaon to play holi with gopis at Nandgaon. Holi played at Barsana is unique in the sense that here women chase men away with sticks. Males also sing provocative songs in a bid to invite the attention of women. Women then go on the offensive and use long staves called "lathis" to beat men folk who protect themselves with shields. The women of Barsana start preparing a month in advance. 'The mother-in-laws feed their daughters-in-law rich food so that they show off their prowess on the Holi battle zone. It is a show of love, fun and equality.

Rang De

Lath mar Holi (Hindi: लट्ठमार होली) is a local celebration of the Hindu festival of Holi. It takes place well before the actual Holi in the town of Barsana near Mathura in the state of Uttar Pradesh. The name means "that Holi in which people hit with sticks" (laṭh is a thick traditional staff). Legend has it that Lord Krishna visited his beloved Radha's village on this day and playfully teased her and her friends. Taking offence at this, the women of Barsana chased him away. Since then, men from Krishna's village, Nandgaon, visit Barsana to play Holi in the town which has the distinction of having the only temple dedicated to Radha in India. In the sprawling compound of the Radha Rani temple in Barsana, thousands gather to witness the Lath Mar holi when women beat up men with sticks (laṭh or lāṭhī) as those on the sidelines become hysterical, sing Holi Songs and shout Sri Radhey or Sri Krishna. The Holi songs of Braj mandal are sung in pure Braj Bhasha. On the first day of Lath Mar Holi gops ( shepherds ) from Nandgaon come to Barsana to play Holi with the gopis of Barsana. The festival begins with a ceremony at the Radha Rani temple. After this ceremony gops then march out of the temple on the Rang Rangeeli Gali where they stop to play holi with the gopis, who stand in groups along the street. The second day gops from Barsana go to Nandgaon to play holi with gopis at Nandgaon. Holi played at Barsana is unique in the sense that here women chase men away with sticks. Males also sing provocative songs in a bid to invite the attention of women. Women then go on the offensive and use long staves called "lathis" to beat men folk who protect themselves with shields. The women of Barsana start preparing a month in advance. 'The mother-in-laws feed their daughters-in-law rich food so that they show off their prowess on the Holi battle zone. It is a show of love, fun and equality.

Color in the Air

Lath mar Holi (Hindi: लट्ठमार होली) is a local celebration of the Hindu festival of Holi. It takes place well before the actual Holi in the town of Barsana near Mathura in the state of Uttar Pradesh. The name means "that Holi in which people hit with sticks" (laṭh is a thick traditional staff). Legend has it that Lord Krishna visited his beloved Radha's village on this day and playfully teased her and her friends. Taking offence at this, the women of Barsana chased him away. Since then, men from Krishna's village, Nandgaon, visit Barsana to play Holi in the town which has the distinction of having the only temple dedicated to Radha in India. In the sprawling compound of the Radha Rani temple in Barsana, thousands gather to witness the Lath Mar holi when women beat up men with sticks (laṭh or lāṭhī) as those on the sidelines become hysterical, sing Holi Songs and shout Sri Radhey or Sri Krishna. The Holi songs of Braj mandal are sung in pure Braj Bhasha. On the first day of Lath Mar Holi gops ( shepherds ) from Nandgaon come to Barsana to play Holi with the gopis of Barsana. The festival begins with a ceremony at the Radha Rani temple. After this ceremony gops then march out of the temple on the Rang Rangeeli Gali where they stop to play holi with the gopis, who stand in groups along the street. The second day gops from Barsana go to Nandgaon to play holi with gopis at Nandgaon. Holi played at Barsana is unique in the sense that here women chase men away with sticks. Males also sing provocative songs in a bid to invite the attention of women. Women then go on the offensive and use long staves called "lathis" to beat men folk who protect themselves with shields. The women of Barsana start preparing a month in advance. 'The mother-in-laws feed their daughters-in-law rich food so that they show off their prowess on the Holi battle zone. It is a show of love, fun and equality.

Holi ka Rang

Lath mar Holi (Hindi: लट्ठमार होली) is a local celebration of the Hindu festival of Holi. It takes place well before the actual Holi in the town of Barsana near Mathura in the state of Uttar Pradesh. The name means "that Holi in which people hit with sticks" (laṭh is a thick traditional staff). Legend has it that Lord Krishna visited his beloved Radha's village on this day and playfully teased her and her friends. Taking offence at this, the women of Barsana chased him away. Since then, men from Krishna's village, Nandgaon, visit Barsana to play Holi in the town which has the distinction of having the only temple dedicated to Radha in India. In the sprawling compound of the Radha Rani temple in Barsana, thousands gather to witness the Lath Mar holi when women beat up men with sticks (laṭh or lāṭhī) as those on the sidelines become hysterical, sing Holi Songs and shout Sri Radhey or Sri Krishna. The Holi songs of Braj mandal are sung in pure Braj Bhasha. On the first day of Lath Mar Holi gops ( shepherds ) from Nandgaon come to Barsana to play Holi with the gopis of Barsana. The festival begins with a ceremony at the Radha Rani temple. After this ceremony gops then march out of the temple on the Rang Rangeeli Gali where they stop to play holi with the gopis, who stand in groups along the street. The second day gops from Barsana go to Nandgaon to play holi with gopis at Nandgaon. Holi played at Barsana is unique in the sense that here women chase men away with sticks. Males also sing provocative songs in a bid to invite the attention of women. Women then go on the offensive and use long staves called "lathis" to beat men folk who protect themselves with shields. The women of Barsana start preparing a month in advance. 'The mother-in-laws feed their daughters-in-law rich food so that they show off their prowess on the Holi battle zone. It is a show of love, fun and equality.

Color Splash

To attend photo tour lead by Canon Photo Mentor to this and such places in India connect here: www.lightchasers.in Lath mar Holi (Hindi: लट्ठमार होली) is a local celebration of the Hindu festival of Holi. It takes place well before the actual Holi in the town of Barsana near Mathura in the state of Uttar Pradesh. The name means "that Holi in which people hit with sticks" (laṭh is a thick traditional staff). Legend has it that Lord Krishna visited his beloved Radha's village on this day and playfully teased her and her friends. Taking offence at this, the women of Barsana chased him away. Since then, men from Krishna's village, Nandgaon, visit Barsana to play Holi in the town which has the distinction of having the only temple dedicated to Radha in India. In the sprawling compound of the Radha Rani temple in Barsana, thousands gather to witness the Lath Mar holi when women beat up men with sticks (laṭh or lāṭhī) as those on the sidelines become hysterical, sing Holi Songs and shout Sri Radhey or Sri Krishna. The Holi songs of Braj mandal are sung in pure Braj Bhasha. On the first day of Lath Mar Holi gops ( shepherds ) from Nandgaon come to Barsana to play Holi with the gopis of Barsana. The festival begins with a ceremony at the Radha Rani temple. After this ceremony gops then march out of the temple on the Rang Rangeeli Gali where they stop to play holi with the gopis, who stand in groups along the street. The second day gops from Barsana go to Nandgaon to play holi with gopis at Nandgaon. Holi played at Barsana is unique in the sense that here women chase men away with sticks. Males also sing provocative songs in a bid to invite the attention of women. Women then go on the offensive and use long staves called "lathis" to beat men folk who protect themselves with shields. The women of Barsana start preparing a month in advance. 'The mother-in-laws feed their daughters-in-law rich food so that they show off their prowess on the Holi battle zone. It is a show of love, fun and equality.

Rang Rasiya

Holi celebration at Nandgaon is one of the best Holi celebrations one can come across and it is extremely challenging to shoot what with colors all around including your eyes and camera. You just cannot see through the viewfinder and it will require some real skills to compose and shoot. Lath mar Holi (Hindi: लट्ठमार होली) is a local celebration of the Hindu festival of Holi. It takes place well before the actual Holi in the town of Barsana near Mathura in the state of Uttar Pradesh. The name means "that Holi in which people hit with sticks" (laṭh is a thick traditional staff). Legend has it that Lord Krishna visited his beloved Radha's village on this day and playfully teased her and her friends. Taking offence at this, the women of Barsana chased him away. Since then, men from Krishna's village, Nandgaon, visit Barsana to play Holi in the town which has the distinction of having the only temple dedicated to Radha in India. In the sprawling compound of the Radha Rani temple in Barsana, thousands gather to witness the Lath Mar holi when women beat up men with sticks (laṭh or lāṭhī) as those on the sidelines become hysterical, sing Holi Songs and shout Sri Radhey or Sri Krishna. The Holi songs of Braj mandal are sung in pure Braj Bhasha. On the first day of Lath Mar Holi gops ( shepherds ) from Nandgaon come to Barsana to play Holi with the gopis of Barsana. The festival begins with a ceremony at the Radha Rani temple. After this ceremony gops then march out of the temple on the Rang Rangeeli Gali where they stop to play holi with the gopis, who stand in groups along the street. The second day gops from Barsana go to Nandgaon to play holi with gopis at Nandgaon. Holi played at Barsana is unique in the sense that here women chase men away with sticks. Males also sing provocative songs in a bid to invite the attention of women. Women then go on the offensive and use long staves called "lathis" to beat men folk who protect themselves with shields. The women of Barsana start preparing a month in advance. 'The mother-in-laws feed their daughters-in-law rich food so that they show off their prowess on the Holi battle zone. It is a show of love, fun and equality.

Celebration of Life

Holi celebration at Nandgaon is one of the best Holi celebrations one can come across and it is extremely challenging to shoot what with colors all around including your eyes and camera. You just cannot see through the viewfinder and it will require some real skills to compose and shoot. Lath mar Holi (Hindi: लट्ठमार होली) is a local celebration of the Hindu festival of Holi. It takes place well before the actual Holi in the town of Barsana near Mathura in the state of Uttar Pradesh. The name means "that Holi in which people hit with sticks" (laṭh is a thick traditional staff). Legend has it that Lord Krishna visited his beloved Radha's village on this day and playfully teased her and her friends. Taking offence at this, the women of Barsana chased him away. Since then, men from Krishna's village, Nandgaon, visit Barsana to play Holi in the town which has the distinction of having the only temple dedicated to Radha in India. In the sprawling compound of the Radha Rani temple in Barsana, thousands gather to witness the Lath Mar holi when women beat up men with sticks (laṭh or lāṭhī) as those on the sidelines become hysterical, sing Holi Songs and shout Sri Radhey or Sri Krishna. The Holi songs of Braj mandal are sung in pure Braj Bhasha. On the first day of Lath Mar Holi gops ( shepherds ) from Nandgaon come to Barsana to play Holi with the gopis of Barsana. The festival begins with a ceremony at the Radha Rani temple. After this ceremony gops then march out of the temple on the Rang Rangeeli Gali where they stop to play holi with the gopis, who stand in groups along the street. The second day gops from Barsana go to Nandgaon to play holi with gopis at Nandgaon. Holi played at Barsana is unique in the sense that here women chase men away with sticks. Males also sing provocative songs in a bid to invite the attention of women. Women then go on the offensive and use long staves called "lathis" to beat men folk who protect themselves with shields. The women of Barsana start preparing a month in advance. 'The mother-in-laws feed their daughters-in-law rich food so that they show off their prowess on the Holi battle zone. It is a show of love, fun and equality.

Rangeela Re

A participant asked me during our tour how do I compose an image when we can hardly see anything through the viewfinder? Do I shot blindly like many do specially during this Samaj ceremony? The answer is NO. Yes you just Can't see through the viewfinder to compose a perfect moment / shot. But then there is a method to madness. Yes it is tough but this is where the concept of pre-visualization comes into focus. I observed that this person like many others will raise their hand singing at a particular time and on a particular sentence being sung. At other times he would look down and do nothing. I composed the image keeping him in center and the other two by his side looking forward and pre-visaulised the shot. I clicked when the moment came and he started singing raising his hand. But honestly I just could not see that the man by side looked away when I clicked the shutter button. It is your shot, it is your hard work and remember you are there with thousands of photographers thronging the place jostling to get better images. and if you do not work hard and put thoughts behind each image you click, then you too may fall in the category of those who will get "lucky" with some shots. Canon 5D Mark II, Canon 24-105 lens, f/4, 1/125, ISO 200, Exposure Bias -0.67 step, Partial Metering, AWB

Give me Red

A typical scene from Samaj at Nandgaon temple during Latth Maar Holi.

Happy Holi

Wishing all my friends a Very Happy and Colorful Holi.

Holi Chants

A typical scene from the Samaj at Lath Maar holi at Nandgaon. For more Photography Tours on various genres pls. check here: http://lightchasers.in

Toy Soldiers

Your art is what you imagine it to be. Tried this monochrome image from the vibrant colorful image from Rang Leela Tour. A risky image which might not be liked by many but its perfectly alright with, Wanted to create something different and am highly satisfied with the result. For more such photo tours click here: http://lightchasers.in/

Caged Joy

A woman in her shop at Vrindavan. They have to cage their shops like this to protect themselves from the monkey menace.

A Reveller

A reveller at Nandgaon temple a few moments before the deluge of colors started.

Time to Pray

A man offering prayers at Nandgaon Temple during Lath Maar Holi. For more photography tours pls. check here: wwwlightchasers.in